Retinal detachment

The retina is a thin tissue that lines the inner surface of the back of the eye, containing light-sensitive cells. A retinal detachment is the separation of the retina from the wall of the eye to which it is normally attached.

It is a serious eye problem that occurs most frequently in:

  • Middle-aged and elderly people.
  • Short-sighted people.
  • Relatives of patients who have already suffered a retinal detachment as a result of a contusion to the eye.
  • In rare occasions it is a hereditary disease and can even occur during childhood.

Some of the symptoms of retinal detachment can be:

  • Black floaters or speckles
  • Flashes of light
  • Wavy or watery vision
  • A dark shadow in certain areas of the vision
  • Blurred central vision
  • Rapid loss of vision
  • Total loss of vision in one eye

Symptoms will depend on how far the retinal detachment has progressed.

The purpose of the treatment are firstly, closing the tear or break that has led to the retinal detachment by the use of laser techniques or cryotherapy and, secondly, placing the retina back in place.

What does the treatment of retinal detachment consist of?

Once the retina has pulled away, treatment is always surgery.

The purpose of the treatment are firstly, closing the tear or break that has led to the retinal detachment by the use of laser techniques or cryotherapy and, secondly, placing the retina back in place.

This can be performed by pushing from the outside of the eyeball’s wall towards the retina, by placing silicone belts or pieces, or by performing a vitrectomy and then introducing gas or silicone oil into the vitreous cavity.